Bankruptcy Landmines

The 7 Most Common Bankruptcy Mistakes

 

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One of the major concerns in your case is whether or not you will have any bankruptcy landmines. Landmines are painful issues in your case that you will not like, and without an attorney's advice, you will never know they're coming until they hit you. However, with proper planning, landmines can often be avoided. This is why receiving legal advice from an experienced attorney is critical. A few examples of potential landmines are:

 

1) Six months before filing your case you paid Aunt Sally back the $5,000 loan she gave you. The unforeseen landmine is that you (or Aunt Sally) will be liable to the bankruptcy court for $5,000. Your case will be dismissed if you don't pay it.

 

2) Ten months before filing your case you sold your boat to Brother Joe because you needed cash. The boat was worth $7,000 but you sold it to him for $4,000. The unforeseen landmine is that you will be liable to the bankruptcy court for $3,000, the difference between the amount you sold it for and the fair market value. 

 

3) Your mother put your name on her bank account a long time ago, but you don't use the account and it's not your money so you think nothing of it. She has $10,000 in the account on the day you file your bankruptcy. The unforeseen landmine is that the bankruptcy court can take half, or possibly even all, of that money.

 

There are MANY such landmines.... Bankruptcy is a dangerous gig when you don't know the game!!  (NOTE: You should NOT do anything to alter these situations if you have them, such as taking your name off of mom's account, because that will only make things worse. There are better ways to repair the damage so please get some legal advice.)  

The 7 Most Common Bankruptcy Mistakes

 

Request your free copy now!!

 

Your Name (required)

Your Email (required)

 

One of the major concerns in your case is whether or not you will have any bankruptcy landmines. Landmines are painful issues in your case that you will not like, and without an attorney's advice, you will never know they're coming until they hit you. However, with proper planning, landmines can often be avoided. This is why receiving legal advice from an experienced attorney is critical. A few examples of potential landmines are:

1) Six months before filing you case you paid Aunt Sally back the $5,000 loan she gave you. The unforeseen landmine is that you (or Aunt Sally) will be liable to the bankruptcy court for $5,000. Your case will be dismissed if you don't pay it.

2) Ten months before filing your case you sold your boat to Brother Joe because you needed cash. The boat was worth $7,000 but you sold it to him for $4,000. The unforeseen landmine is that you will be liable to the bankruptcy court for $3,000, the difference between the amount you sold it for and the fair market value.

3) Your mother put your name on her bank account a long time ago, but you don't use the account and it's not your money so you think nothing of it. She has $10,000 in the account on the day you file your bankruptcy. The unforeseen landmine is that the bankruptcy court can take half, or possibly even all, of that money.

There are MANY such landmines.... Bankruptcy is a dangerous gig when you don't know the game!! There are MANY such landmines.... Bankruptcy is a dangerous gig when you don't know the game!! (NOTE: You should NOT do anything to alter these situations if you have them, such as taking your name off of mom's account, because that will only make things worse. There are better ways to repair the damage so please get some legal advice.)

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The information contained herein is for informational purposes only. It is not intended to constitute legal advice or to create an attorney-client relationship. We do not make any recommendations or endorsement as to any legal issue or procedure discussed. The nature of any particular legal issue should be considered on a case-by-case basis, and the information described herein is not necessarily a guide to your individual circumstances. It is advised that you seek independent legal advice to determine your particular legal needs.

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